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Trello is a really cool tool. It is simple, fast and helpful. And free! You can create boards for everything: Hiring, Product Development, Customer Requests, Personal ToDo, etc. Trello has a solid mobile support, real-time collaboration, passionate community and many add-ons.

However, with company growth, you start to feel limitations. You want to see cards better, customize what you see and what you don’t see. You want to manage 100+ cards easily, without constant scrolling. You want functionality that previously you didn’t need, like time tracking, sorting and more.

Targetprocess solves many problems that Trello can’t solve. However, it comes with a cost. Targetprocess is more complex and has some learning curve. Are you ready to put some effort to overcome Trello limitations? You decide.

Information Density

Trello is not designed to work with huge amount of data. If you have a board with at least 100 cards it looks quite messy. No zooming, no collapsing, limited filtering. You don’t know the solution maybe, but you feel that something doesn’t feel right.

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In Targetprocess you can collapse columns and see cards as small boxes. You can hover on boxes to see additional details. You can even drag and drop these small cards into other columns. Collapsing helps you to hide information quickly.

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Moreover, you can zoom in and out to see more or less details on cards. If you have 10+ cards in a column that may be extremely handy. Just compare the picture above with the picture below:

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Let’s take a more complex case. Sometimes you have a huge backlog with 100+ cards. Not good, but happens. How to manage it in Trello? it is really hard I should say.

Let’s take a look into Targetprocess. Here you see a Kanban board. It looks like backlog management is bad here as well. You see just 7 cards from backlog, while the other 121 cards are hidden.

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Now let’s focus on just two columns: Planned and In Dev. You see much more cards on a single screen and can do something with them: set priorities, move into development, etc.

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Still it is hard to skim through backlog in this view. People like to skim lists, not 2D boards. No problem, zoom in to see cards in a list-like mode:

imageCan you imagine doing this in Trello?

Next time I will show you some killer features in Targetprocess like multiple selection and batch drag and drop, powerful filters, sorting and swimlanes.

I was always confused by two buttons in Google Doc editor: highlight text and highlight background. I constantly made the same mistake again and again clicking on the wrong button. I used this feature several years, but still did wrong clicks…

This year they changed icons and I finally learned them!

The second icon is very good, it clearly shows that background color is here. First icon was unchanged (almost) and it is still wrong. So I learned the second icon finally and rarely click to the wrong one.

However, recently Google changed that and combined both actions into a single button. Am I happy? Hell no! Initial design was good, just with wrong icons. It was a 1-click design. New design is a 2-click design and I don’t like this change.

Interestingly, I never hit wrong icon in MS Word. Maybe it they have good icons? Pages also has a clear solution:

While I think Google Doc Editor is the best online editor, it got slightly worse this week.

Most experienced programmers have encountered projects where an apparently trivial subproblem turns out to be more difficult than the major anticipated problems.
The creation of genuinely new software has far more in common with developing a new theory of physics than it does with producing cars or watches on an assembly line.
Sacred UX Cow: Testing
Adaptive behavior might emerge more generally in open thermodynamic systems as a result of physical agents acting with some or all of the systems’ degrees of freedom so as to maximize the overall diversity of accessible future paths of their worlds (causal entropic forcing).
In practice, such agents might estimate causal entropic forces through internal Monte Carlo sampling of future histories generated from learned models of their world. Such behavior would then ensure their uniform aptitude for adaptiveness to future change due to interactions with the environment, conferring a potential survival advantage, to the extent permitted by their strength (parametrized by a causal path temperature, Tc) and their ability to anticipate the future (parametrized by a causal time horizon, ).